How To Store Camping Chairs

Camping chairs are handy, even when you are not on vacation. They can be used in the backyard and supplement your chairs when you have extra guests. But when these chairs are not in use, they can get in the way. Thus, I looked at the best ways to sash camping chairs.

How to store camping chairs:

  1. Keep Camping Chairs In A Trash Can
  2. Place Chairs Under Benches
  3. Use Large Storage Bins For Chairs
  4. Store Chairs In A Cardboard Box
  5. Install Lockers To Hold Chairs
  6. Stack Chairs on Shelves
  7. Keep Chairs In Loft
  8. Store Chairs In An Empty Drum
  9. Hang Camping Chairs On A Wall Rack Or Hooks
  10. Non-Folding Camping Chairs Can Be Stacked And Covered
  11. Use An Empty Corner in Garage, Basement, Or Utility Room
  12. Stash Camping Chairs Under A Bed

1. Keep Camping Chairs In A Large Trash Can

Clean trash cans can be perfect for storing camping chairs and umbrellas. You don’t even need them to seal unless you have humidity, dampness, and vermin problems. However, many of these heavy-duty bins are made for lids, if you desire. 

If you prefer something with a nicer aesthetic to keep near a patio or deck, there are more attractive all-weather options.

2. Place Camping Chairs Under Benches

Utility benches often are the perfect length to sash camping chairs underneath. Similarly, some work benches provide extra storage for champing chairs and outdoor gear.

For example, this workbench with power outlets has massive amounts of room underneath. The “open” shelf offers enough protection in a dry, arid space so long as the chairs still have their sleeve.

But the chairs will gather dust if their stored bare. However, there is this Seville Classics Rolling Workbench for those that prefer a cupboard style that also has compartments for smaller items. But check the measurements of your chairs and the bench to ensure fit.

3. Use Large Storage Bins For Camping Chairs

Camping chairs can rust. Also, mice, rats, and chipmunks sometimes enjoy gnawing on them. Thus, if you don’t have a dry, arid place to store your equipment, then it is best to seal them up.

Most people won’t need heavy cargo cases. But if you keep a hunting cabin in a swamp or store chairs on a boat, the extra protection is wise.  


However, for your standard un-insulated garage or damp basements, you can use cheaper models with handy pull handles or without

4. Store Camping Chairs In A Giant Cardboard Box

Large appliances are often delivered in giant cardboard boxes:

  • Refrigerators
  • Washing machines
  • Dishwasher
  • Dryer

If the cardboard box is still in good condition, it can be an ideal home for camping chairs and other outdoor gear. We use an old dishwasher box for some of our equipment.

However, cardboard isn’t an ideal material to store any camping equipment if the area is prone to:

  • Humidity or damp
  • Vermin

5. Install Lockers To Hold Camping Chairs

Installing cupboards isn’t always an option. Some people are not gifted in DIY; hiring somebody can be a pain, and many rental agreements don’t allow it. Thus, buying lockers or metal storage cabinets can be an excellent way to add storage in a garage, utility room, or basement. Some metal lockers even have an office vibe.

6. Stack Camping Chairs On Shelves

Camping chairs look round in their sleeves. But these bulky burritos do not actually roll around. Thus, they are pretty easy to stash on long shelves. Also, camping chairs are sturdy enough that tossing bulky items, like sleeping bags on top, works perfectly.

7. Keep Camping Chairs In A Loft, Attic, Or Rafters

Camping chairs can be stashed in unfinished lofts, attics, and rafters. But you might want to put trash bags over your chairs if insulation is uncovered in these spaces. The stuff is prickly, and you don’t want it getting on your skin via the chairs. Bags also keep the creepy crawlies from getting in.

8. Store Camping Chairs In An Empty Drum

An empty metal drum can be a simple way to stash camping chairs. Like using a trash can, it prevents them from falling over and keeps them corralled. Just remember to use this in a dry place where nothing will climb in and make a nest.

9. Hang Camping Chairs On A Wall Rack Or Hooks

Hanging camping chairs on a wall rack or from hooks is an excellent space saver. It gets them off the ground and out of your way, especially when you want to use a garage for parking cars and a laundry room for laundry.

It can be challenging to find racks specifically aimed at storing camping chairs. But those made for umbrellas often work brilliantly for both collapsible camping chairs and those that fold. The umbrella metal wall storage rack is an excellent example.

10. Non-Folding Camping Chairs Can Be Stacked And Covered

The best way to deal with non-folding chairs is to stack them and put a cover over them. It doesn’t have to be a fancy, bespoke covering; a sturdy tarp and a bungee cord work. Then you just stash it in the corner of the deck or garage.

11. Use An Empty Corner in Garage, Basement, Or Utility Room

Yes, those long-forgotten corners and nooks are excellent places to stash camping chairs, camp stretchers, and umbrellas.

12. Stash Camping Chairs Under A Bed

Bed space is excellent for hiding everything you don’t want to see. However, if you have large duffel bags or suitcases already under there, see if your chairs will fit inside. Then the storage space is doing double duty.

How To Store Camping Chairs In Garage

Many of the above suggestions are excellent options for storing camping chairs in a garage. However, pick a solution that offers added protection if your garage is prone to humidity, dampness, or little critters with sharp-pointy teeth.

How Do You Hide Folding Chairs?

Hiding folding chairs is easiest in the back of a cupboard or closet. However, we have cabinets that are not flush against the sides of the room. These slotted nooks are perfect for hiding. Also, consider installing hooks and hanging if your closet or cupboard is flush against a back wall.

Author at Wilderness Redefined camping website

James has been escaping to the outdoors for as long as he can remember. This first started in family camping trips but soon turned into adventure camps and hiking through the Scottish Hebrides. Now he has turned towards trying to make camping more comfortable and accessible.