The most comfortable sleeping pad for backpacking is the Sea to Summit Ether Light XT Insulated sleeping pad

Most Comfortable Sleeping Pad in 2022

Best Backpacking Pad
Most Comfortable
Best Budget Backpacking Pad
Sea to Summit Ether Light XT Sleeping Pad Exped Megamat 10 Self-Inflating Sleeping Pad NEMO Quasar 3D Sleeping Pad
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Sea to Summit Ether Light XT Sleeping Pad Exped Megamat 10 Self-Inflating Sleeping Pad NEMO Quasar 3D Sleeping Pad
A backpacking sleeping pad that does a great job of balancing comfort with a low weight. A ridiculously comfortable sleeping pad for camping. Self-inflating setup makes setting up this air pad a breeze. A super comfortable backpacking pad for those who love a great sleep on a budget.

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Last Updated: September 25, 2022

A bad night’s sleep can easily ruin a trip to the great outdoors. Spending a night on a bad sleeping pad can leave you exhausted the next morning, after having dealt with rocks digging into your back and a deflating pad half way through the night.

But camping and backpacking doesn’t have to be this way. Modern sleeping pads can be very comfortable.

I’ve reviewed dozens of sleeping pads to find out which are the most comfortable.

If you’re in a rush, the most comfortable sleeping pad for camping is the Exped Megamat 10. A super comfortable sleeping pad that is as comfy as a real bed.

The most comfortable sleeping bag for backpacking is the Sea to Summit Ether Light XT sleeping pad. This is a lightweight pad that doesn’t compromise on comfort.

The most comfortable sleeping pads are:

  1. Exped Megamat 10 Insulated Self-Inflating Sleeping PadMost Comfortable
  2. Sea to Summit Ether Light XT Insulated Air Sleeping PadBest backpacking pad
  3. NEMO Quasar 3D Insulated Air Sleeping PadBest budget backpacking pad
  4. Big Agnes Insulated Q-Core Deluxe Sleeping Pad
  5. NEMO Tensor Ultralight Insulated Sleeping PadBest ultralight sleeping pad
  6. TETON Sports ComfortLite XXL Sleeping PadBest budget camping pad
  7. Therm-a-Rest NeoAir Xtherm Sleeping PadBest for cold weather
  8. Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite Sleeping Pad
  9. Sea to Summit Ultralight Insulated Air Sleeping Pad
  10. Sea to Summit Comfort Light Insulated Air Sleeping Pad

Do note that many of these pads come in smaller options (primarily for women) and larger options.

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Best Backpacking Pad

Sea to Summit Ether Light XT Ultralight Sleeping Pad

Best Budget Backpacking Pad

Nemo Equipment Quasar 3D Sleeping Pad

Big Agnes Insulated Q-Core Deluxe Sleeping Pad

Best Ultralight Sleeping Pad

NEMO Tensor Insulated Ultralight Sleeping Pad

Best Budget Camping Pad

TETON Sports ComfortLite XXL Sleeping Pad

Best for Cold Weather

Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XTherm Sleeping Pad

Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite Sleeping Pad

Sea to Summit Ultralight Backpacking Sleeping Pad

Sea to Summit Comfort Light Sleeping Pad

Sea to Summit Ether Light XT Sleeping Pad

NEMO Quasar 3D Sleeping Pad

Big Agnes Q-Core Sleeping Pad

NEMO Tensor Ultralight Sleeping Pad

TETON Sports ComfortLite XXL Sleeping Pad

Therm-a-Rest NeoAir Xtherm Sleeping Pad

Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite Sleeping Pad

Sea to Summit Ultralight Sleeping Pad

Sea to Summit Comfort Light Sleeping Pad

Ranking2nd3rd4th5th6th7th8th9th10th
Rating /5

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.2

4.2

4.2

4.2

4.0

3.9

Comfort4.54.54.54.24.03.83.83.63.6
Weight4.74.34.34.81.54.85.04.74.5
Packed Size4.54.64.45.02.54.74.74.74.5
Warmth4.04.04.54.54.84.84.54.04.0
Ease of setup4.44.43.93.54.84.04.03.94.0
Durability3.53.53.53.04.34.03.53.53.5
Review

A backpacking sleeping pad that does a great job of balancing comfort with a low weight.

A super comfortable backpacking pad for those who love a great sleep on a budget.

A decent ultralight backpacking pad but the materials are fragile.

A decent camping sleeping pad found at an affordable price.

Excellent insulation for cold weather and winter backpacking.

Most comfortable sleeping pads Compared

If you’re looking for the comfiest sleeping pad, the Exped Megamat ticks all the boxes.

The Exped is an air bed with a layer of comfy open cell foam padding. The easiest way to visualise this is the comfy memory foam toppers you get on mattresses. This sleeping pad is the closest thing you can get to sleeping in a bed.

The 3.9 inch thickness means people who like to sleep on their side don’t wake up in the middle of the night with their shoulders and hips digging into the ground.

And the self-inflating feature means you just need to set the nozzle, leave the pad to inflate itself and then top it off with a couple of pumps of the pump sack. This sleeping pad really couldn’t be much easier to set up.

It’s a durable pad, coming with thick materials that will help avoid any tearing that can result in a deflated pad. And these help provide an r-value (read: insulation rating) of 8.9 – plenty for cold weather.

But these thick materials do mean that the sleeping pad is too heavy for backpacking and should only be used for camping trips. If you need a backpacking pad – skip down to our review of the Sea to Summit Ether Light XT pad.

The standard version is 6 foot long, so tall people will want to consider opting for the 6 foot 6 inch “long” version. And you can also get the sleeping pad in a double size if you want to share it with a partner.

Overall this is an excellent sleeping pad for camping. It’s not incredibly cheap but if you struggle getting comfortable on your side then you will not regret this pad.


The Sea to Summit Ether Light XT pad is an excellent backpacking pad.

These backpacking pads don’t quite compare to the added foam comfort of the Exped Megamat but the Sea to Summit Ether Light XT is very comfortable. This is helped by its four inch thickness that will keep you off the hard ground and the hundreds of air filled springs within the pad.

This pad comes in a variety of sizes, including small (5’6” and below), regular (6’0” and below) and long (6’7” and below) lengths. It comes as both a tapered mummy shaped pad and a rectangular pad.

Some people who sleep on their side may need the extra width of the rectangular pad if you like to place your knees high up as the mummy shaped version is quite narrow.

This pad is very lightweight. The regular mummy version comes in at only 1 lb 1 oz. This isn’t quite as light as the ultralight 12oz NeoAir XLite but all but the most hardcore ultralight crowd are likely to enjoy the extra comfort.

As is typical of backpacking pads, this pad does make a noise when you move around on it. Thankfully it is not the high pitched crinkly sound (think bags of chips) that many of the pads, such as the NeoAir XLite make.

Instead, the Ether Light makes a more rubbery sound (think rubbing a balloon). This is much lower frequency and less annoying than a crinkly sound, so if you’re backpacking with others it might be preferred.

The Sea to Summit Ether Light XT is super easy to inflate. The pump sack is really good at inflating the pad and the valve system makes it very easy to adjust the pad to find the right level of inflation for comfort.

The only important negative for the Ether Light is that it isn’t suitable for winter backpacking. The r-value of 3.2 means the pad is best used in three season weather conditions.

Overall, an excellent backpacking pad that ticks many of the important backpacking features while providing loads of comfort.


The NEMO Quasar 3D is another excellent sleeping pad for backpacking. So how does it compare to the Sea to Summit Ether Light XT?

The Quasar is as comfortable as the Ether Light – both of these provide superb comfort and plenty of thickness. I also like the elevated baffle at the end of the NEMO Quasar which provides a place for your head.

Note that the Quasar only comes in a rectangular shape. This may be preferred for people with broad shoulders, but do double check that it fits in your tent since backpacking tents often taper in towards the foot.

They’re also very evenly matched on insulation, with r-values of 3.3 and 3.2 respectively.

However, the Ether Light XT pad edges out the Quasar pad on weight, coming in 3 ounces lighter when comparing the rectangular versions or 8 oz lighter if you compare it with the mummy shaped Ether Light XT. Sure, the NEMO Quasar has a slightly smaller packed size, but 8 ounces is a fairly sizable weight saving.

It’s also difficult to adjust the inflation of the NEMO Quasar pad to the right comfort level while you’re lying down.

That all being said, the NEMO Quasar can quite often be picked up for cheaper. So if you’re looking for a more budget version of the Ether Light XT pad that is very close in quality, the Quasar will be an excellent choice.


The Big Agnes Insulated Q-Core Deluxe is another excellent, comfortable sleeping pad that comes in a rectangular shape.

It’s as comfortable as the NEMO Quasar and the Sea to Summit Ether Light XT and as lightweight as the NEMO Quasar, even if it does take up a little more space in the backpack.

Its main benefit over these other two pads is its insulation. Coming in at an r-value of 4.3, this pad is well enough insulated to use in winter camping (extreme cold excluded).

While the Therm-a-rest NeoAir Xtherm is a better choice for very cold weather, I would recommend picking the Big Agnes pad for those who want to go backpacking in winter while also staying comfortable.

This sleeping pad does lose marks for a very small pump sack which makes setting up the pad a more painful process than some of these other pads.

Overall this pad is very versatile and provides plenty of the benefits that the Ether Light XT and NEMO Quasar do, while providing more warmth in cold weather.


The NEMO Tensor sleeping pad is an excellent ultralight sleeping pad coming in at 14 ounces and by FAR the smallest packed size of all these sleeping pads. Yes – it even takes up half the volume of the ultralight NeoAir sleeping pads.

The r-value is fairly decent at 4.2, the same as the NeoAir XLite. This is plenty for cold weather camping but not high enough for extreme cold.

The NEMO Tensor is surprisingly comfortable given its ultralight status. This is certainly helped by its 3 inch thickness – more than the NeoAir competitors. For this reason, I would encourage any ultralight backpackers to consider the Tensor if they’ve found 2.5” pads too thin.

However, there is a major drawback with this sleeping pad and this relates to how NEMO have managed to keep this sleeping pad so light given the extra thickness. The materials are super thin and the pad feels fragile.

You will probably want to bring something to put under the pad to reduce any chances of punctures.

Overall, an excellent ultralight sleeping pad but you’ll have to be okay with taking care of this pad.


Like the idea of the Exped Megamat 10 pad but you’re on a tight budget? Enter the TETON Sports ComfortLite XXL Sleeping Pad.

This is another camping only pad due to its weight and packed size. To be up front, it’s not as comfortable as the Exped. There’s no comfy foam. And this pad is only 2.5” thick which is thin enough to start worrying about hips and shoulders digging into the ground if there is any deflation through the night.

But there’s a lot going for this pad. First and foremost, it’s ridiculously affordable. If you’re buying pads for all the family, buying a bunch of ComfortLite’s would certainly be more budget conscious.

It’s also a self-inflating pad, making it easy to inflate and set up. And it comes in wider than the Exped Megamat which is good for anyone with broad shoulders.

However, it’s just not quite as comfy or durable as the Exped Megamat pad. So while it’s still a “best buy”, I would recommend upgrading when possible.


The Therm-a-Rest NeoAir Xtherm pad boasts great credentials for cold weather backpacking with the highest r-value of this review – 8.1. This is plenty for even a pretty cold winter trip.

This sleeping pad is also one of the most durable pads on the list. It comes with a 70D nylon / 30D ripstop nylon material which are much thicker and more robust materials than a standard backpacking sleeping pad.

It’s also ultralight, weighing only 15oz and coming in with a super small stuff sack that will easily fit into your pack.

So why isn’t the NeoAir XTherm sleeping pad top of the list?

Unfortunately, the NeoAir XTherm isn’t as comfortable as many of the other pads. The 2.5 inch thickness is worrying close to the ground if you sleep on your side.

On top of this, have you ever wondered what it’s like to sleep on a potato chip mattress? This sleeping pad has a loud crinkly sound whenever you move. Some people don’t mind it, but for light sleepers like myself or anyone you might be backpacking with it’s an issue.

Overall, the Therm-a-rest NeoAir XTherm is a great sleeping pad, but perhaps best suited to those who sleep on their back.


The Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite is one of the best known sleeping pads. It’s certainly ultralight, coming in at only 12 ounces and a small packed size.

The NeoAir XLite is very similar to the XTherm where the former is built for three season and some cold weather while the latter has been built to handle very cold temperatures.

The NeoAir XLite therefore is less insulated than the XTherm, but it’s still good at an r-value of 4.2. The other major difference is the materials. The XLite is lighter due to thinner, 30D ripstop nylon fabric which is not untypical for backpacking sleeping pad.

Unfortunately, the NeoAir XLite suffers from many of the same issues as the XTherm. It’s dangerously thin for people who sleep on their side at 2.5 inches but some people might get away with it.

The XLite also makes a crinkling noise every time you move. This high pitched rustling is likely to wake up anyone else you’re outdoors with and may make you self conscious about moving around too much or turning over.

Overall, the XLite is a good sleeping pad but those who don’t sleep on their back will be frustrated at the lack of thickness. The NEMO Tensor is probably the better option for ultralight backpackers. And for everyone else, there is a big jump up in comfort when opting for the sleeping pads at the top of this review.


The Sea to Summit Ultralight sleeping pad is pitched as a budget ultralight pad and certainly provides value for money.

It’s lightweight at 17 ounces and has a small packed size.

However, it’s outclassed by many of the other sleeping pads in this review.

The R-value is the lowest of these sleeping pads, coming in at only 3.1. You’ll want to avoid using this pad in very cold weather.

And while it’s light, ultralight backpackers will be able to shave 5 ounces off by going for the NeoAir XLite instead.

Weighing in at 17 ounces, you could choose the 17 ounce Sea to Summit Ether Light XT pad instead. The Ether Light is much more comfortable and doesn’t come with the thin 2 inch depth of the Sea to Summit Ultralight pad.

It does make a rubbery noise when you move around on it but this is preferable to the crinkly noise of the NeoAir XLite.

But overall, if you want an ultralight pad – choose the NEMO Tensor or the NEOAir XLite. If you want a lightweight and comfortable pad, choose the Ether Light XT. Yes, they’re often a little more expensive but this is for a reason.


The Sea to Summit Comfort Light is a backpacking sleeping pad aiming to prioritise comfort. Ironically, its name does not reach the intended aim of being comfortable and light, but is better described as light on comfort.

Firstly, it’s not that light. The regular model comes in at 1 lb 6 ounces while only being a meagurly 2.5 inch thick. Many of the other pads in this review are much thicker and more comfortable at similar or lighter weights.

With only 2.5 inch thickness, those who sleep on their side are always going to be worried about hips and shoulders digging into the ground. But the sleeping pad also feels a little … lumpy. Rather than vertical baffles or horizontal baffles, it comes with a cell design. Some like this, others won’t.

And like the NeoAir pads, it also emits a high pitched crinkly sound due to the reflective barriers and baffling.

Is this a bad sleeping pad? Certainly not. It’s still a good pad compared to most products out there. However, I would recommend you check out the sleeping pads at the top of this review given that they provide better comfort for a similar price.


Our review criteria for a comfortable sleeping pad

What Situation Are You Using Your Sleeping Pad In?

While some sleeping pads are better than others, there is no such thing as a perfect sleeping pad. Instead, different sleeping pads aim to excel in different conditions.

The first condition you’ll want to consider is whether you’re using the sleeping pad for camping or for backpacking.

Campers typically primarily care about how comfortable the pad is, the ease of setup, durability, shape and cost. Primarily you’ll want a comfy sleeping pad for a great night’s sleep.

Backpackers should still care about all of the above, but weight and packed size also enter the equation. No matter how comfy a sleeping pad is, it won’t suit a backpacker if it weighs ten pounds. The desire for a lightweight or ultralight pad does necessitate the use of specific materials and often adds to the price.

Next up is the season. Most sleeping pads perform great in three season weather. But when heading into a winter, you’ll really start to care about the insulation that the sleeping pad provides you from the cold ground. Insulation ratings are covered in our section on “R-value”.

I’ve laid out the criteria below that I’ve used to rate these sleeping pads. Just bear in mind that the situation you’re using the pad in will affect which criteria matter the most, so do consider whether you’re in the trail or camp category.

Choosing the Correct sleeping pad

Air Sleeping pads

Air pads fill up with air (suprise surprise!) to provide a comfortable bed on the ground. These sleeping pads are very versatile as they typically pack down small in a backpack when deflated and can be fairly lightweight.

Most people find air pads more comfortable than closed-cell foam pads. The trick here is to make sure you don’t fully inflate the pad. A slightly deflated pad will better conform to the shape of your body.

Some air pads can be noisy when you’re moving about at night so this is something to consider if you’re going outdoors with others. Another minor annoyance is that you’ll want to avoid bare skin against these pads as the feeling isn’t very pleasant.

Air pads can vary in price, but ultralight varieties can get very expensive.

Air pads are a good choice for either campers or backpackers but lightweight options excel for backpacking.

Closed-cell foam pads

A foam pad is made of a very dense foam and is typically found rolled up like a yoga mat.

They’re cheap, lightweight and durable but they aren’t particularly comfortable to sleep on. You’re also going to need to attach most of these to the outside of your backpack as they can take up quite a lot of packed space.

Closed cell foam sleeping pads are a good choice for thru-hikers due to their durability. For most other cases, I would recommend an air pad or self-inflating pad.

Self inflating sleeping pads

Self-inflating sleeping pads combine open cell foam and air pads and can be very comfortable. Even better still, their self-inflating feature makes them super easy to set up without the need for a hand pump.

The additional foam also provides less chance of a puncture which provides a more durability than air pads. On the flipside, this does add weight to the pad so if you’re an ultralight backpacker you’ll probably prefer an air pad.

Open cell foam sleeping pads

If closed cell foam sleeping pads are like yoga mats, then open cell foam sleeping pads are like a thin memory foam mattress. These can be super comfy and are the closest thing to sleeping in a bed.

However, they’re super bulky and heavy compared to these other pads. Open cell foam pads only work well for car camping.

Most comfortable sleeping pad Overall

The Exped Megamat 10 is the most comfortable sleeping pad. The combined foam, air pad, space and thickness result in a great night’s sleep whether you sleep on your side or your back.

However, the Exped Megamat is large and heavy enough to make it okay for camping only.

Backpackers will want to look towards the Sea to Summer Ether Light XT, the Big Agnes Insulated Q-Core or the NEMO Quasar 3D sleeping pad for comfort.

ProductsComfort
Exped Megamat 10 Insulated Self-Inflating Sleeping Pad5.0
Sea to Summit Ether Light XT Insulated Air Sleeping Pad4.5
Big Agnes Insulated Q-Core Deluxe Sleeping Pad4.5
NEMO Quasar 3D Insulated Air Sleeping Pad4.5
NEMO Tensor Ultralight Insulated Sleeping Pad4.2
TETON Sports ComfortLite XXL Sleeping Pad4.2
Therm-a-Rest NeoAir Xtherm Sleeping Pad3.8
Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite Sleeping Pad3.8
Sea to Summit Ultralight Insulated Air Sleeping Pad3.6
Sea to Summit Comfort Light Insulated Air Sleeping Pad3.6

Starting with the basics, you’re going to want a sleeping pad that fits your shape. If you’re tall, double check the length of these pads as they’re often quite economical in size.

If you have broad shoulders you may want a slightly wider pad. This will allow you to sleep in the foetal position without your knees hanging off the side of the pad.

Sleeping pads typically come in one of two shapes. Rectangular pads are … well … just that! Mummy shaped pads are shaped like an Egyptian sarcophagus for a mummy and has a wider head area that runs inwards to narrower feet.

People with broad shoulders or who sleep in the foetal position may prefer rectangular pads so that their knees don’t go off the pad but this can be quite person dependent as to whether it is an issue.

If you’re considering a rectangular pad, do bear in mind that many backpacking tents similarly have a wider head area and a narrower foot area. So you’re going to want to make sure that the pad fits inside the tent at the narrowest end.

Thicker sleeping pads are also comfier. A thick pad is especially important to side sleepers as it prevents your hip and shoulder from digging into the hard ground.

I recommend a minimum thickness of 2 inches if you sleep on your side and all of the sleeping pads in this review meet this threshold.

Sleeping PadThickness (in)
Sea to Summit Ether Light XT Insulated Air Sleeping Pad4.0
Exped Megamat 10 Insulated Self-Inflating Sleeping Pad3.9
Big Agnes Insulated Q-Core Deluxe Sleeping Pad3.5
NEMO Quasar 3D Insulated Air Sleeping Pad3.5
NEMO Tensor Ultralight Insulated Sleeping Pad3.0
Therm-a-Rest NeoAir Xtherm Sleeping Pad2.5
Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite Sleeping Pad2.5
Sea to Summit Comfort Light Insulated Air Sleeping Pad2.5
TETON Sports ComfortLite XXL Sleeping Pad2.5
Sea to Summit Ultralight Insulated Air Sleeping Pad2.0

Air pads, self-inflating pads and open cell foam pads are all comfortable. Although backpackers will need to be wary about the amount that foam pads weigh.

Best Ultralight Sleeping Pads And Light Pads

Every pound on your back counts when you’re backpacking in the wilderness. Cutting weight where possible could make a big difference to your experience.

If you’re planning on backpacking, I recommend choosing a pad that weighs less than 2 lbs. Ideally you should opt for one that is as light as possible but the ultralight varieties are often significantly more expensive.

If you’re car camping, skip this section!

The lightest sleeping pad is the Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite, coming in at only 12 ounces.

However, if comfort is a priority and you’re happy to add six ounces, I would recommend the Sea to Summit Ether Light XT sleeping pad as the backpacking pad that combines both comfort with a low weight.

Sleeping PadWeight
Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite Sleeping Pad Regular12 oz
Therm-a-Rest NeoAir Xtherm Sleeping Pad Regular15 oz
NEMO Tensor Ultralight Insulated Sleeping Pad Regular15 oz
Sea to Summit Ultralight Insulated Air Sleeping Pad Regular1 lb 1 oz
Sea to Summit Ether Light XT Insulated Air Sleeping Pad Regular1 lb 2 oz
Sea to Summit Comfort Light Insulated Air Sleeping Pad Regular1 lb 6 oz
Big Agnes Insulated Q-Core Deluxe Sleeping Pad Regular1 lb 9 oz
NEMO Quasar 3D Insulated Air Sleeping Pad Regular1 lb 9 oz
Exped Megamat 10 Insulated Self-Inflating Sleeping Pad Regular4 lbs 9 oz
TETON Sports ComfortLite XXL Sleeping Pad4 lbs 13oz

Pads That Don’t Take Up Much Room In Your Backpack

It can often be quite difficult to compare the packed size of sleeping pads when some are thicker and others are longer. To make up for this, I’ve calculated the packed size volume for each sleeping pad in the table below.

The NEMO Tensor easily wins for the smallest packed size. It is 3 ounces heavier than the XLite but this sleeping pad is able to pack down so small that it may be preferable for backpackers with limited backpack space.

The table below also does highlight that some of the more comfortable sleeping pads do take up more space in the backpack. So if space is a concern. The NEMO Quasar 3D pad provides a good balance between packed size and comfort.

Sleeping PadPacked Size (in)Packed Size Volume (cubic inches)
NEMO Tensor Ultralight Insulated Sleeping Pad Regular8 x 3226
Therm-a-Rest NeoAir Xtherm Sleeping Pad Regular9 x 4452
Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite Sleeping Pad Regular9 x 4452
Sea to Summit Ultralight Insulated Air Sleeping Pad Regular9 x 4452
NEMO Quasar 3D Insulated Air Sleeping Pad Regular8 x 4.5509
Sea to Summit Ether Light XT Insulated Air Sleeping Pad Regular9.5 x 4.5604
Sea to Summit Comfort Light Insulated Air Sleeping Pad Regular9.5 x 4.5604
Big Agnes Insulated Q-Core Deluxe Sleeping Pad Regular8.5 x 5668
TETON Sports ComfortLite XXL Sleeping Pad31.5 x 6.754509
Exped Megamat 10 Insulated Self-Inflating Sleeping Pad Regular31.3 x 9.89444

Pads With High R-Values For Cold Weather And Winter

Many people incorrectly consider comfort to be the primary reason for a sleeping pad. The most important job of a sleeping pad is, in fact, keeping you off the ground. The cold ground will quickly sap away any body heat and can leave your temperature dangerously low.

But sleeping pads, and particularly air pads, don’t automatically protect you from the cold ground. These need to be insulated to avoid the cold transferring through the air in the pad.

The standard measurement of sleeping pad insulation is the R-value. The higher the R-value, the more insulated the sleeping pad.

Here’s a quick guide to picking the right minimum R-value:

  • Summer (min 50°F / 10°C): R-value of 1 – 2
  • Three season (min 32°F / 0°C): R-value of 2 – 4
  • Cold (min 20°F / -6°C): R-value of 4 – 5.5
  • Extreme cold (min 0°F / -18°C): R-value of 5.5 and higher

The Exped Megamat 10 sleeping pad has the highest R-value and is therefore the most insulated sleeping pad. This is helped by all the foam surrounding the air pad.

However, this pad is for campers only.

For backpackers, the Therm-a-Rest NeoAir Xtherm pad has the highest R-value and will be plenty for most winter situations.

If you’re not backpacking in very cold weather, all of these pads will be warm enough for your trip. And you can always bring some extra foam to place below a sleeping pad to add a little extra insulation.

Sleeping PadR-Value
Exped Megamat 10 Insulated Self-Inflating Sleeping Pad8.1
Therm-a-Rest NeoAir Xtherm Sleeping Pad6.9
TETON Sports ComfortLite XXL Sleeping Pad5.9
Big Agnes Insulated Q-Core Deluxe Sleeping Pad4.3
Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite Sleeping Pad4.2
NEMO Tensor Ultralight Insulated Sleeping Pad4.2
Sea to Summit Comfort Light Insulated Air Sleeping Pad3.7
NEMO Quasar 3D Insulated Air Sleeping Pad3.3
Sea to Summit Ether Light XT Insulated Air Sleeping Pad3.2
Sea to Summit Ultralight Insulated Air Sleeping Pad3.1

Sleeping Pads That Are Easy To Inflate And Set Up

Sleeping pads can be inflated in a number of ways. Those who are used to more old school camping will be familiar with blowing up the pad with their mouth.

But sleeping pads have advanced a lot and many pads are easy to inflate without having to go red in the face.

Backpacking pads are typically inflated using the sack the sleeping pad comes in. You just need to hook pump sacks up to the valve, open the sack up wide to get plenty of air in, and then close the sack and start crushing the sack. Once you’ve filled the pad to the desired firmness, you just need to chuck your sleeping bag on.

The added benefit of the pump is that it avoids getting any moisture into the sleeping pad from your breath.

Sleeping pads that are easy to set up typically have large sacks that inflate the pad without taking too many pumps with the pad sack.

Overinflating an air pad is a recipe for a poor night’s sleep. If you lie on your side you will likely wake up with a dead arm. Trying to find the right level of comfort often takes deflating the sleeping pad to the preferred level.

Easy setup here will be helped by gear with good valves that allow you to easily adjust the deflation while you’re lying on the pad.

The easiest sleeping pads to set up are definitely the self-inflating pads. These include the Exped Megamat 10 pad and the TETON Sports ComfortLite pad.

Self-inflating pads are as simple as using the valves and letting them self-inflate. They’ll then typically need a small top up to get to your preferred level of inflation using the pump sack.

However, bear in mind that these self-inflating pads work best when you store them correctly. This is doubly true given the foam on these pads.

You’ll want to store them inflated at home. This is technically true for all pads, but more so for the self-inflating ones.

ProductsEase of setup
Exped Megamat 10 Insulated Self-Inflating Sleeping Pad4.8
TETON Sports ComfortLite XXL Sleeping Pad4.8
Sea to Summit Ether Light XT Insulated Air Sleeping Pad4.4
NEMO Quasar 3D Insulated Air Sleeping Pad4.4
Sea to Summit Comfort Light Insulated Air Sleeping Pad4.0
Therm-a-Rest NeoAir Xtherm Sleeping Pad4.0
Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite Sleeping Pad4.0
Big Agnes Insulated Q-Core Deluxe Sleeping Pad3.9
Sea to Summit Ultralight Insulated Air Sleeping Pad3.9
NEMO Tensor Ultralight Insulated Sleeping Pad3.5

Durability Of These Pads

When we’re spending a pretty penny on a new sleeping pad, we all want it to last a lifetime. But, to be frank, sleeping pads are not known for their durability.

All it takes is the smallest hole for your pad to start deflating during the night. No one likes waking up in the middle of the night with their shoulder and hip digging into the ground. These issues are so common that most sleeping pads come with a repair kit already included.

No sleeping pads win full marks for durability because … this is the nature of all sleeping pads. But some choices certainly are more durable than others.

What makes a sleeping pad durable? Generally, thicker materials and good build quality. Thin materials risk tears on rocks or twigs resulting in a leak.

The Exped Megamat 10 pad is the most durable sleeping pad in our review. This is thanks to its high denier materials (50D nylon and 75D polyester) and the foam padding that you often see in the heavier camping pads.

However, the backpacking pads try to avoid using materials this thick to avoid adding too much weight.

The Therm-a-Rest NeoAir Xtherm is the most durable backpacking sleeping pad and comes with a 70D nylon and 30D ripstop nylon materials.

The rest of these hiking and backpacking pads typically come with 30D nylon or a 30D and 40D nylon combination.

The one exception here is the NEMO Tensor pad. This comes with very thin materials – 20D nylon. And you can tell. It feels very fragile when you’re handling it, to the point that I would consider putting something under it to avoid tearing. Unless you’re an ultralight fan, I probably wouldn’t pick this pad for longevity.

In general, it’s better to go for a big brand rather than the constantly disappearing brands that appear on many marketplaces. Not all big brands are good, but at least the warranty is often more reliable.

The table below shows our reviews for durability.

ProductsDurability
Exped Megamat 10 Insulated Self-Inflating Sleeping Pad4.5
TETON Sports ComfortLite XXL Sleeping Pad4.3
Therm-a-Rest NeoAir Xtherm Sleeping Pad4.0
Big Agnes Insulated Q-Core Deluxe Sleeping Pad3.5
Sea to Summit Ether Light XT Insulated Air Sleeping Pad3.5
NEMO Quasar 3D Insulated Air Sleeping Pad3.5
Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite Sleeping Pad3.5
Sea to Summit Ultralight Insulated Air Sleeping Pad3.5
Sea to Summit Comfort Light Insulated Air Sleeping Pad3.5
NEMO Tensor Ultralight Insulated Sleeping Pad3.0
Author at Wilderness Redefined camping website

James has been escaping to the outdoors for as long as he can remember. This first started in family camping trips but soon turned into adventure camps and hiking through the Scottish Hebrides. Now he has turned towards trying to make camping more comfortable and accessible.