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The best 2 person backpacking tent

Best Small Pack Size
This 2-person tent is of great quality and packs down to only 18” x 6”, so it’s easy to slip inside any backpack. The MSR Hubba Hubba NX-2 is also an ultralight tent that won’t weigh you down, but it’s a pricey tent.
Best Overall
This tent is the easiest to carry, thanks to its small packing size and ultralight weight. It also comes with two vestibules, so it’s spacious to live in.
Easiest to Carry
A good all-round, ultralight 2-person tent with quality nylon fabric. It’s designed to allow campers to split it between backpacks. This 2-person tent is small, so it’s best shared with someone you know well.

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Last Updated: April 10, 2021

Backpacking tents have different requirements from your common tents. You’ll want your tent to be as light as possible and easy to carry around. But you’ll still need it to handle storms and last long enough to enjoy it for many trips.

Whether you’re looking to upgrade to a high-tech, ultralight model or buy your first tent for a hiking adventure, we’ve found something for everybody.

If you’re in a hurry, these are the best 2-person backpacking tent models.

Product

Review

Rating

Price

Best Overall

This tent is the easiest to carry, thanks to its small packing size and ultralight weight. It also comes with two vestibules, so it’s spacious to live in.

5.0/5.0

Best Small Pack Size

This 2-person tent is of great quality and packs down to only 18” x 6”, so it’s easy to slip inside any backpack. The MSR Hubba Hubba NX-2 is also an ultralight tent that won’t weigh you down, but it’s a pricey tent.

4.3/5.0

Easiest to Carry

A good all-round, ultralight 2-person tent with quality nylon fabric. It’s designed to allow campers to split it between backpacks. This 2-person tent is small, so it’s best shared with someone you know well.

4.3/5.0

Most Versatile

This tent comes in an igloo design with vertical walls that makes this a versatile option. It’s light enough for backpacking and large enough to be comfortable for car camping between two.

4.1/5.0

Best for Beginners

A great budget-friendly backpacking tent for beginners and durable for use in poor weather. This tent only comes with one vestibule and is quite tight, so it’s most comfortable for one backpacker.

4.0/5.0

Best Value

This low-cost two-person tent is lightweight enough to take camping and easy to figure out even for a camping newbie. Despite the low price, ALPS Mountaineering tents are made with quality materials and offer great value overall.

3.9/5.0

Best A-Frame Tent

For campers who want something different, this modern interpretation of the traditional A-frame tent is an interesting option. It resists bad weather well and has a large awning, but it’s heavier to carry than the ultralight 2-person tent models on our list.

3.7/5.0
Table of Contents

What Backpacking Tent Do We Recommend?

The Big Agnes Copper Spur is our recommendation for the best 2-person tent because of its overall quality and lightweight design.

Why Trust Us?

When we looked through the best 2-person backpacking tents, we took into account all the aspects of these tents. Our top pick combines the best qualities, from the light weight and room it takes up in your backpack to its durability. We also prioritized quality waterproofing to find the 2-person tent that best holds up in poor weather.

Reviews of the Best Tents for Two People

Here are our top picks, from best to worst. Even though some of them are budget models, all of them are solid tents for a backpacking trip.

Best Overall
Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL Tent (1/2/3/4 Person)
This tent is the easiest to carry, thanks to its small packing size and ultralight weight. It also comes with two vestibules, so it’s spacious to live in.
Overall:

Pros

  • Steep walls give you more living space.
  • Two awning-type vestibules.
  • Ultra-lightweight for backpacking.
  • Media pockets and ports included.
  • Great weather resistance.

Cons

  • High price.

Weight: 2.11lbs | Dimensions: 4’4” (W) x 7’4” (L) x 3’4” (H) | Bag Dimensions: 19.5” x 6” | Doors: 2 | Power Cord Vent: Yes | Hydrostatic Head Rating: 1200mm | Price: $$$

The Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL2 is one of the lightest and smallest backpacking tents you can find on the market. Despite its tiny packed size, it still has plenty of room for hanging out. The steep walls make it more comfortable to live in than many other dome-type 2-person tents. 

What campers love about this tent is that it has double doors and the rain fly converts into two big vestibules. You can use this space for relaxing outside the tent in poor weather or blazing sunshine. It’s also handy for cooking in the rain. And when you head to sleep, the double layer of fabric protects you well from the elements.

The Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL2 also has some smart features that can make your life easier. For example, it has small pouches on the inside for your electronics, with a cable port. 

Overall, it offers fantastic value for money. It’s tough to find something bad to say about this tent, but the high price tag is probably the worst part. If you can afford it, we recommend you check this tent out. 


Overall:

Pros

  • Packs into a small size.
  • Two doors with vestibules.
  • Spacious interiors.
  • Good ventilation.

Cons

  • Waterproofing is not always 100 percent effective.

Weight: 3.5lbs | Dimensions: 4’2” (W) x 7’ (L) x 3’3” (H) | Carry Bag Dimensions: 18” x 6” | Doors: 2 | E-port: No | Hydrostatic Head Rating: 3000mm | Price: $$$

The MSR Hubba Hubba NX-2 two-person tent is among our favorites because it packs down to only 18” x 6”. It’s one of the smallest pack sizes available, and it’s easy to slip the convenient carry bag into your backpack. The 3.5-pound weight is also low enough to keep with you even on a longer hike. 

The design includes doors with vestibules on both sides, so you can sleep in this tent comfortably with two people. You can use the vestibules to keep your gear, shoes and outdoor clothes without occupying your sleeping space inside. The two doors and mesh roof on the interior tent also allow for great ventilation.

In general, the MSR Hubba Hubba NX-2 is a high-quality tent that endures rough weather well. Some customers have had minor issues with leakage, but the bathtub-style floors and tough fabric have kept most campers dry.


Easiest to Carry
Nemo Dagger Ultralight 2 Person Backpacking Tent
A good all-round, ultralight 2-person tent with quality nylon fabric. It’s designed to allow campers to split it between backpacks. This 2-person tent is small, so it’s best shared with someone you know well.
Overall:

Pros

  • Easy to divide into two packs to carry.
  • Vertical walls that give more headroom.
  • Mesh inner tent for good ventilation.
  • Two spacious vestibules.
  • Lots of space inside for personal items.

Cons

  • Tight width for two campers.

Weight: 3.5lbs | Dimensions: 4’2” (W) x 7’6” (L) x 3’ (H) | Bag Dimensions: 19.5 x 6“ | Doors: 2 | Power Cord Vent: No | Hydrostatic Head Rating: 1200mm | Price: $$$

The Nemo Dagger is a good pick for couples or friends looking to share their gear between two backpacks. It comes with the Dual Sack feature, designed to allow you to split the tent for a lighter, easier carry.

This 2-person tent is also overall a quality option that comes with just enough space for two people to camp if you know each other well. It has double doors and vestibules, so you can store your outdoor gear there and save some sleeping room. You also won’t have to crawl over the other person to get out in the morning.

Because of the narrow design, though, it’s not ideal for two adults who don’t know each other well. For a solo camper with a pet, a couple or two close friends, it’s a good deal.

If you’re camping in poor weather, the 1200mm waterproof nylon is enough to repel a normal rainstorm. In dry, warm conditions, the full-mesh inner tent lets you enjoy the stars and keeps the air flowing through the night.


Most Versatile
Marmot Limelight 2 Person Camping Tent w/Footprint
This tent comes in an igloo design with vertical walls that makes this a versatile option. It’s light enough for backpacking and large enough to be comfortable for car camping between two.
Overall:

Pros

  • Igloo design with lots of indoor space.
  • Comes with a separate footprint.
  • Plenty of pockets inside.
  • Quick-pitch design.
  • Great for 3-season use.

Cons

  • High weight for longer hikes.

Weight: 5.6lbs | Dimensions: 4’5” (W) x 7’2” (L) x 3‘6” (H) | Carry Bag Dimensions: 7” x 18” | Doors: 2 | E-port: No | Hydrostatic Head Rating: 1500mm | Price: $$

The Marmot Limelight is a fantastic igloo-type tent that has lots of interior space. It’s not the lightest tent to carry with you, but it’s certainly a good option for those who prioritize space. 

Thanks to the vertical walls and height, this tent even fits a cot to sleep more comfortably when you’re car camping. This protects you from the cold if you like taking your tent on year-round adventures. For those who sleep on the ground, the Marmot Limelight also comes with a separate groundsheet to keep you dry. 

Keep in mind that this tent is not the best model for those who hike longer stretches. It’s not an ultra-lightweight tent, and the package is not the smallest, so you’ll probably notice the weight on your back after several hours.

If you don’t want to waste any time setting up your tent, this tent comes with a quick-pitch design. There’s no passing poles through sleeves, just attach the easy clips and tighten the rain fly over the tent and you’re done.

It also has lots of space for your flashlights and other smaller items inside, so you don’t waste time looking for them.


Overall:

Pros

  • Great value for a low price.
  • Tough build for 3-season use.
  • Vestibule to keep your outdoor gear. 

Cons

  • Small, only room for one.

Weight: 4.7lbs | Dimensions: 4’1” (W) x 6’10” (L) x 3‘3” (H) | Carry Bag Dimensions: 6” x 18” | Doors: 1 | E-port: No | Hydrostatic Head Rating: 3000mm | Price: $

Among the best two-person backpacking tent models, this one is one of the low-cost tents. It’s great for beginners but more comfortable for one backpacker because of its small size and single door and vestibule. 

The tent is narrow and short compared to others, so you won’t have as much room for your gear inside. It would also work great on car camping trips with your friends when you want the extra privacy of your own tent.

With the small size also comes a surprisingly low weight, considering that this isn’t a high-tech, ultralight backpacking tent. For the price, we think it’s an excellent investment, especially for campers who are just getting into wilderness exploring.

The weatherproofing of this tent is also amazing for the low price. The floors are tough and can resist sleeping in a humid environment, and the walls have a 3000mm hydrostatic rating, which can handle a storm without letting in water.


Overall:

Pros

  • Good weatherproofing.
  • Low price.
  • Gear loft and storage space on the inside.
  • Durable materials.
  • Easy to pitch. 

Cons

  • Heavy for hiking.
  • The zippers are annoying and can get stuck.

Weight: 5.12lbs | Dimensions: 5’ (W) x 7’6” (L) x 3’10” (H) | Carry Bag Dimensions: 20” x 6” | Doors: 2 | E-port: No | Hydrostatic Head Rating: N/A | Price: $

The Alps Mountaineering Lynx is another low-cost tent that’s just lightweight enough to take backpacking but won’t break the bank. It’s a good tent for car camping, as well as for campers who aren’t sure if backpacking is for them.

It’s a traditional dome tent model that’s easy to pitch, even if you’re a camping newbie. The mesh interiors include a gear loft on the roof and storage pockets on the sides.

These tents are made with surprisingly high-quality and durable materials for their price. The fabric is good quality; the floors have a 2000mm waterproof rating and the sealed seams prevent water from getting in. 

On the doors, you’ve got large zippers to help you get in and out easily. Some customers have had experience with these zippers getting stuck. This can be a problem if you’re trying to get inside in the rain, but it’s not the most common experience.


Best A-Frame Tent
Eureka! Timberline SQ Backpacking Tent (2/4 Person)
For campers who want something different, this modern interpretation of the traditional A-frame tent is an interesting option. It resists bad weather well and has a large awning, but it’s heavier to carry than the ultralight 2-person tent models on our list.
Overall:

Pros

  • Easy to set up.
  • Large awning at the door.
  • Great 3-season weatherproofing with bathtub-style floors.
  • Good ventilation. 

Cons

  • Heavy to carry.

Weight: 6.05lbs | Dimensions: 4’11”(W) x 7’3”(L) x 3’7”(H) | Bag Dimensions: 6” x 24” | Doors: 2 | Power Cord Vent: No | Hydrostatic Head Rating: N/A | Price: $$

For campers looking for something different, Eureka offers this modern interpretation of more traditional A-frame tents. It’s easy to set up once you’ve figured it out and has two large doors and one wide awning at the front to store your outdoor gear. 

The tent is just big enough for two people, but it’s also the heaviest in our review. You can divide the poles and fabric into different backpacks, but it can still weigh you down on a longer hike. This tent is also the largest to carry, so it may not fit comfortably inside your backpack. 

It holds up well in the weather, making it a great 3-season tent. The bathtub-style floors keep water out, and according to campers, the rainfly is efficient at blocking water. The inner tent has a lot of mesh, which helps ventilation in the summer but will make it too cold for really chilly weather.


What We Were Looking For

These are some of the features we valued when making our picks of the best two-person tent models.

Lightest Backpacking Tent

Winner: Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL 2-Person

Weight is probably the biggest factor when choosing a backpacking tent. In this category, the Big Agnes Copper Spur takes the prize. 

Four people with backpacks standing at a high spot overlooking a valley.

Lightweight vs. Ultralight Tents

Ultra-lightweight tents are specifically designed for backpacking. They’re more expensive than common lightweight tents, but they’re made with specific technologies that can cut the weight in half. Many of them also won’t take up much room in your backpack.

If you’re taking a backpacking trip that doesn’t require a lot of hiking, you can go for a lightweight tent, up to around 6 pounds. These are also good options for beginner backpackers. But if you want to keep your backpack as light as possible, opt for the models around 3 pounds.

Size: How Much Room Does It Take?

The size is also important for a backpacking tent. The poles of a tent are always a little long, but you can find models that fit into about 20 inches. And if you’re going backpacking, avoid pop-up and instant 2-person tents, as they usually take up a lot of space, and the shape can be awkward to carry.

Tent Weight Packed Size
Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL 2-Person2.6lbs19.5”x6”
MSR Hubba Hubba NX-23.5lbs18”x6”
Nemo Dagger UL 2-Person Tent3.5lbs19.5”x6”
Marmot Limelight 2P Tent5.6lbs18”x7”
Naturehike 2-Person Cloud-Up4.7lbs18”x6”
ALPS Mountaineering 2-Person Lynx5.75lbs20”x6”
Eureka! Timberline 2-Person Tent6.05lbs24”64”

Best Backpacking Tent for Bad Weather

Winner: Marmot Limelight 2P

If you want to stay dry through the night, you’ll need a tent that can handle storms and prevent condensation. Many tent manufacturers include a hydrostatic rating on their tent fabrics, so you’ll know how much water they can take. But there’s more to weatherproofing than just the rating.

Rainfly

The best backpacking tents come with a separate fly for good waterproofing. They usually also have bathtub-style floors, a groundsheet, and tapered or welded seams. And whichever tent you pick, it’s always a good idea to add some sealant to the seams if you’re heading out into rough weather.

Even if it’s not raining, a double-walled tent with a rainfly will keep you protected from condensation in the tent walls. You’ll likely see some humidity inside your tent in cold weather and from dew in the mornings. Look for vents and windows to promote good airflow and allow moist air to escape the tent.

The Marmot Limelight also comes with a separate groundsheet to keep the tent floor extra protected from the rain.

Wind Protection

Another possible weather issue with your tent is the wind. It can bend or break poor-quality poles, and it can loosen the rain fly, making it less protective. This is where guylines are important, as they keep the fly taut.

Which Backpacking Tent Performs Best in Summer and Winter?

Winner: Nemo Dagger UL 2-Person Tent

When you’re camping in the summer, especially in warmer climates, you’ll probably want to prioritize ventilation. Tents with mesh walls allow for better airflow and let you sleep comfortably, but they don’t block the sun. You’ll wake up earlier because of the light, but at least the temperature inside the tent won’t rise too fast.

If you want to keep the tent cool and dark, look for models with a dark-room design. These options aren’t as well-ventilated, but they don’t let in sunshine, so you get to sleep longer and cooler.

In the cold, you’ll benefit from thicker tent walls and floors. Mesh interiors aren’t the ideal option if you’re looking for all-season comfort, so opt for thicker materials instead. Some car campers also use a cot to stay farther away from the ground and keep warm inside their tent.

How Durable Is It and Will It Last Long?

Winner: Naturehike 2-Person Cloud-Up

The durability of your tent is a major factor, especially if you’re looking for an affordable model. You can’t expect a budget tent to last as long as a high-tech tent would, but it should still be reasonably good quality. The Naturehike tent is a great example of such a tent.

Fabric

For backpacking tents, the fabrics are usually polyester or nylon, which are both lightweight. They’re not as tough as canvas tents, but nylon generally holds up better than polyester. Quality stitching can also make a big difference when you’re picking out a tent.

Poles

Poles are another spot that can make or break your tent investment. The most common lightweight tent options have either aluminum or fiberglass poles, of which aluminum is more durable. Fiberglass isn’t necessarily a bad option, but it needs to be much thicker than aluminum to handle the same weight.

Easiest Backpacking Tent To Set up 

Winner: Marmot Limelight

All these two-person tent models can be set up by one person, but some are easier than others to assemble. A wilderness pro will have no problem with any of these tent models, but beginners may need to practice at home before heading out. 

If you know you’re going to be in a hurry to put up camp, the Marmot Limelight tent is an excellent option. The quick pitch system is easy to use when the night is falling, or it’s raining. Also, you won’t have to pass the poles through sleeves, which can be a pain in the darkness.

Camping in Comfort

Winner: ALPS Mountaineering 2-Person Lynx

When it comes to backpacking with another person, you’ll need a tent that’s as wide as possible. The widest are the ALPS Mountaineering and the Eureka! Timberline models. The ALPS tent and the Nemo Dagger are also really long, which gives you more room for your gear.

Remember that two-person tents are usually tight on interior space. Some of them only have enough floor area for one person, while others will fit two. They’re still always quite narrow, so make sure you’re with a person you don’t mind sleeping close to!

If you want room for two people with large backpacks, we recommend going for one of the tents that has two doors with vestibules. You can both keep your boots, backpacks and cooking gear in the awning, and the doors will give you freedom of movement.

TentFloor area (W x L x H)
Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL 2-Person4’4” x 7’4” x 3’4”
MSR Hubba Hubba NX-24’2” x 7’ x 3’3”
Nemo Dagger UL 2-Person Tent4’2” x 7’6” x 3’
Marmot Limelight 2P Tent4’5” x 7’2” x 3‘6”
Naturehike 2-Person Cloud-Up4’1” x 6’10” x 3‘3”
ALPS Mountaineering 2-Person Lynx5’ x 7’6” x 3’10”
Eureka! Timberline 2-Person Tent4’11” x 7’3” x 3’7”

Which Backpacking Tent Is Best for Tall People?

For tall people, the ALPS Mountaineering 2-Person Lynx can be a great pick. It’s well over 7 feet long and has plenty of headroom. If you’re willing to spend a little more, the Marmot Limelight has a spacious igloo design that even fits a cot inside.

Storage Options

What makes these tents special is that they include storage pockets sewn onto the inner tent material. These help you keep your small personal items, such as cameras and flashlights, next to you without losing them. 

The Big Agnes Copper Spur is the winner here because of its handy media pockets and e-port. 

Doors

Most of these tents come with double doors to make it easier to go camping between two people, and vestibules to keep your gear. Some of the vestibules also double as a porch that protects you from the sun or rain.

The Big Agnes Copper Spur has two wide, awning-type vestibules that are ideal for cooking when it’s raining. You can also set them up like a normal awning to protect your gear. 

Person standing on a rock in front of a small lake in hilly terrain.

FAQ—What Else Should I Know About Backpacking Tents? 

Still have more questions about the best two-person tents for backpacking? Let’s go through some of the most common doubts campers have.

Should You Go for a Freestanding Tent?

Freestanding tents are easier to use, especially if you’re camping in the same spot for longer or if you’re new to camping. If you don’t like the spot you picked for the tent, you can move it around easily if it stands on its own. 

You’ll save some time with freestanding tents because you won’t have to take the whole thing down each time.

Should You Choose Single-Walled or Double-Walled Backpacking Tents?

We recommend going for a double-walled backpacking tent unless you’re only camping in a desert in the summer heat. In any other place, you’ll likely get some condensation on the inner walls. Single-walled backpacking tents can also get chillier in the fall and spring.

How To Pack a Tent Into a Backpack?

You can pack a tent into a backpack in many different ways depending on the weather conditions and other items you’re carrying. 

If you’re expecting poor weather, keeping the tent close to the top of your backpack can be the best choice. This way, you can get it out and set up your tent faster. If the poles are bulky, you can also strap them on the outside of your backpack to save room.

Otherwise, we recommend packing your tent in the middle part of your backpack to keep the weight off your shoulders. You can also use the tent body or footprint to wrap them around bulky items, like your cooking gear, to prevent them from moving.

How To Set up a Backpacking Tent?

How to set up your backpacking tent depends on the tent you pick, but here are some general recommendations.

  1. Find a level surface without rocks or large roots that will trouble your sleep.
  2. Spread the tent fabric on the ground.
  3. Extend the tent poles and attach them to the tent body. This can be either by passing them through sleeves or clipping them on the poles.
  4. Stake down the tent and attach the ends of the poles to it.
  5. Cover the tent with a rain fly if needed, and use guy lines to stretch it taut.
Person with a backpack walking on a trail in nature.

The Winner

The best two-person backpacking tent, in our opinion, is the Big Agnes Copper Spur. It’s a high-quality tent that’s also high-budget, but definitely worth the investment.

Backpackers love the ultra-low weight of this tent and the small packing size. It’s hardly noticeable in your backpack but still offers plenty of space for living. The two large vestibules are versatile, and the storage pockets are a smart addition that makes it easier to stay organized.

We recommend you check out this ultralight, top-notch tent or any other models we included in this review!

Author at Wilderness Redefined camping website
James Black

James has been escaping to the outdoors for as long as he can remember. This first started in family camping trips but soon turned into adventure camps and hiking through the Scottish Hebrides. Now he has turned towards trying to make camping more comfortable and accessible.